Stress, Grief & Weight Gain

Researchers have found a link between emotional issues like stress, anxiety, trauma and depression, and higher body mass indexes (BMI). If you can relate to the idea of overindulging after a bad day, or to help deal with bad news, it’s time to let me help.

How can stress and emotions cause weight gain?

Stress, trauma and emotions are linked to hormonal changes that influence the rate your store and burn fuel. They also trigger disordered eating behaviours such as grazing or over indulging. Keeping a healthy mindset and establishing healthy eating patterns are the first steps towards maintaining a healthy body weight.

Examples of disordered eating

  • Alcohol intake (drinking more 2 glasses more than 2 nights per week)
  • Fasting or chronic restrained eating
  • Skipping meals
  • Binge eating or constant ‘grazing’ throughout the day
  • Self-induced vomiting
  • Restrictive dieting
  • Unbalanced eating (e.g. restricting a major food group such as ‘fatty’ foods or carbohydrates)
  • Laxative, diuretic, enema misuse
  • Steroid and creatine use – supplements designed to enhance athletic performance and alter physical appearance
  • Using diet pills

Why are disordered eating and dieting dangerous?

Fad dieting is one of the most common forms of disordered eating. Research shows that fad dieting is common among people with disordered eating patterns.

Severely restricting the amount of food you eat can be a very dangerous practice. When the body is starved of food it responds by reducing the rate at which it burns energy (the metabolic rate), this can result in overeating and binge eating behaviours that can lead to weight gain and obesity.

Feelings of guilt and failure are common in people who engage in disordered eating. These feelings can arise as a result of binge eating, ‘breaking’ a diet or weight gain. A person with disordered eating behaviours may isolate themselves for fear of socialising in situations where people will be eating. This can contribute to low self-esteem and significant emotional impairment.

Fad Diets don’t work

Contrary to popular belief, research has shown that at least one-third to two-thirds of people on diets regain more weight than they have lost within four or five years, and the true number may well be significantly higher. ‘Fad’ diets do not take people’s individual requirements into consideration and can result in a person feeling hungry, experiencing low moods, lacking in energy levels and developing poor health.

Are there risks associated with disordered eating?

There are risks associated with disordered eating. People with disordered eating may experience:

  • Weight gain
  • Osteoporosis
  • Fatigue and poor sleep quality
  • Constipation and/or diarrhoea
  • Headaches
  • Muscle cramps

Is it possible to change disordered eating and dieting behaviour?

Yes. It is possible to change eating behaviour, even if you have been engaging in disordered eating and fad dieting for many years. With the right support and treatment and a high level of personal commitment your body can learn to function to its full capacity again.

Getting in contact can assist you in reversing the adverse effects of disordered eating and restoring emotional, mental and physical health.

Microbiome Bliss Balls

Packed with prebiotic, healing and anti-inflammatory spices, these flavour-packed bliss balls make the perfect snack when trying to lose weight. A great source of long-lasting complex carbohydrates to support glycemic control, prebiotics to support healthy flora, healthy fats to boost brain power, plant protein to keep you satisfied until your next meal, fiber to keep you regular as well as an abundance of vitamins, minerals and powerful antioxidants to nourish the body.

Ingredients

½ cupbuckwheat
½ cuprolled quinoa or oats
¼ cupalmond meal
1 cupdates (pitted)
½ teaspoon
1teaspoon
turmeric
psyllium husks
1teaspooncinnamon
½ teaspoonground ginger
½ teaspooncloves
add pinchblack pepper
¼ teaspoonground cardamom
2tablespoonvanilla plant-based protein powder (optional)
4tablespoon
1teaspoon

lemon juice
vanilla essence
chia seeds, coconut or chopped freeze dried pineapple (optional, to roll)
  1. In a mixing bowl combine the dry ingredients
  2. Add wet ingredients to the dry mix and combine with a wooden spoon or with your hands till really well combined.
  3. Give the mixture a good few squeezes/kneads to make sure everything is combined as it should. Adjust for dryness if necessary.
  4. Break off pieces of the dough and form into balls around the size of a 20c piece.
  5. Store in the fridge in an air-tight container to keep them firm.

Why Is It So Hard To Lose Weight With PCOS?

Many women with polycystic ovary syndrome PCOS find it hard to lose weight. More than half of all women with PCOS are in a unhealthy BMI range and even on the lowest calorie restricted diets, still can’t lose weight. This is because they are weight loss resistant.

One of the most frustrating parts is to receive advice from health care providers to lose weight, but those with this syndrome know it’s not that easy. Many factors can affect your ability to lose weight with PCOS, including certain health conditions, your dieting and weight loss history, age-related changes and your mother’s diet and weight changes during pregnancy.

Treatment options for PCOS are typically aimed at reducing insulin levels and involve diet modifications, exercise, and medications or supplements. But what do you do and where do you go from here if nothing seems to be working?

The good news is, there ways to lose weight with PCOS, but it’s not something you can buy in a box or over the counter. Losing weight with PCOS needs a targeted, tailored approach that incorporates modern science, whole foods and a little help from mother nature.

Here are some reasons why it’s so much harder for women with PCOS to lose weight.

PCOS is linked to loss resistance. High insulin promotes fat storage. This fat can be difficult to lose or resistant to traditional methods such as calorie counting, low carb diets or exercise.GIT #microbiome is a hidden trigger for #PCOS

Elevated insulin levels can be triggered by several factors such as stress, other hormones, health conditions or environmental pollutants.

Researchers have also identified an individuals microbiome or flora also contributes to elevated insulin. This is why some people can literally gain weight eating foods that are healthy for others. Tomatoes are a good example of this! If you have PCOS and want to lose weight, the first place to start is a metabolic assessment. What have you got to lose?

Insulin promotes hunger

As part of promoting fat storage, insulin acts as an appetite-stimulating hormone. High levels of insulin can be why some women with PCOS experience more hunger. Left unmanaged, these cravings can sabotage even the best eating habits, leading to weight gain.

Eating often, including sufficient protein with meals, and avoiding sugary foods are all helpful ways to reduce cravings.

Appetite regulating hormones

Weight loss and weight maintenance can be difficult for women with PCOS due to abnormal levels of appetite-regulating hormones ghrelin, cholecystokinin, and leptin. These hormones may stimulate hunger in women with PCOS, resulting in increased food intake and difficulty managing weight.

Sleep disturbances and insomnia

Women with PCOS are at a risk for developing obstructive sleep apnea. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when there is a blockage of the upper airway that causes a lack of oxygen during sleep. This results in daytime sleepiness, high blood pressure, weight gain and resistant weight loss.

Excess body weight is a cause of sleep apnea and elevated levels of androgens (male hormones such as testosterone) seen in PCOS, can play a role in affecting sleep receptors. Lack of sleep is associated with insulin resistance and weight gain.

When clients ask me ‘Can I lose weight with PCOS? My answer is yes. Losing weight with PCOS needs a targeted, tailored approach that incorporates modern science, whole foods and a little help from mother nature.

My IVF specialist told me to lose weight if I wanted to have a baby. I lost 7kg with PCOS and conceived within 3 months of working with Narelle

Tina Lucas – melbourne

Menopause Belly Fat – ways to fight fat naturally

During menopause, some women find they struggle to lose weight – especially around the mid section. No matter how hard they try, counting calories, cutting the carbs and even exercising 3 times per week, just won’t budge the belly fat kilos. This is because they have weight loss resistance. No matter what they do, the weight won’t shift and no pill, potion or motion will get the scales moving in the right direction. So what do you do when you can’t lose weight during menopause?

Between the ages of 45 and 55, women gain on average half a kilo a year and a total of 2.3 kg during the menopausal transition. #menopauserelief

It isn’t just the weight gain itself; many women find where they lose weight shifts during menopause. Traditionally, women gain weight around their hips and thighs. After menopause, however, that weight gain zones tend to be around the tummy zone. Declining estrogen during menopause increases belly fat, but there are other factors that also cause weight loss resistance such as:

  • Your microbiome changes
  • Your metabolic rate slows down, so you burn fewer calories
  • Your fat cells change, so more fat accumulates as belly fat
  • Menopause can impact sleep, which can impact other fat-regulating hormones including your stress hormone, cortisol
  • Inflammation linked to injury triggers fat cell production
  • You might not be exercising as much

All of these changes plus many more can lead to weight loss resistance during menopause.

Obesity increases in women once they reach the age of 40. About 65 percent of women 40-59 are obese and 73.8 percent of women 60 years older are obese. #midlifecrisis

Abdominal fat in women is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Getting assessed for the underlying cause of hidden weight gain is the first step towards living a healthy, long and active life.

For years I tried to lose weight – I’d lose a couple but gain a few. Working with Narelle meant I finally could maintain a healthy body – without shakes or extreme dieting

Amanda Johns – Geelong

Are You Weight Loss Resistant?

You’re doing everything correctly: count calories, reduce sugar intake, cut out refined foods, and hit the gym 3 times a week. Yet despite your most focused effort, those kilo’s refuse to budge.

Hit a roadblock in your weight-loss journey? When you stay consistently on course and weeks – even months – go by without the scales budging, that’s weight loss resistance. It’s your bodies way of telling you metabolically somethings not right. The best way to beat it is to get assessed.

The calories-in-calories-out model is outdated. It fails to account for the 120 hidden variables that can affect fat loss. Weight loss resistance is when you’re not losing one kilo of fat every week when doing everything right.

There are over 120 hidden causes of weight loss resistance, including pharmaceutical and over-the-counter medications, food allergies or sensitivities, thyroid or adrenal imbalances, microbiome and genetics. At MassAttack, we analyze your lab work and employ additional testing that reveals what sabotages your success.

The reality is: calories matter. If you eat too many calories from any food, your body stores those excess calories as fat. Weight loss resistance is triggered by something that many diet plans neglect or fail to understand: hormonal imbalances triggered by microbiome imbalance.

The truth is, calories matter, but hormones matter more. Hormone imbalances become a major but often overlooked culprit for weight gain and weight loss resistance. Most of those imbalances hinge on one big player: insulin. What many people don’t realize is insulin (your fat saving hormone) is released in response to the consumption of different foods and this response is different for everyone – depending on their unique microbiome. Even something like the humble tomato can be a hidden trigger of weight gain in some people! This is why I incorporate this testing as part of our resistant weight loss assessment.

120kg I knew I had to lose weight. but how could I? I had given up hope. With Narelle’s support and guidance I lost over 40kg and I’ve kept it off.

Joanne Rite – Melbourne

New Cause of Endo. Discovered

New and exciting research links the microbiome to endometriosis. This is exciting as it opens the doors for new treatment strategies including diet, herbal therapeutics and supportive nutrition. You can read more by clicking through to the article below:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-39700-6

Vegetable Curry

  • Vegetable Curry (serves 4)
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 large onions, peeled and sliced
  • 2 tablespoons medium-hot curry powder
  • 2 cups vegetable stock
  • 4 large carrots, peeled and cut into thin sticks
  • 4 parsnips, peeled and cut into thin sticks
  • 250g green beans, trimmed
  • 1 head broccoli, cut into florets
  • 1 cup low-fat natural yoghurt salt and pepper
  • ½ cup fresh coriander leaves fresh chilli, sliced

Heat a large saucepan, add oil and onion, and cook over a low heat for about 10 minutes until onion is softened. Add curry powder, turn up the heat to medium and cook for 1 minute, stirring constantly to toast spices. Add stock and simmer for 5 minutes. Add carrots and parsnips to the pan and simmer uncovered for 5 minutes. Add beans and broccoli, and simmer for a further 5 minutes.

The vegetables should be tender and the liquid reduced by half. Remove the pan from the heat, stir in yoghurt and season with salt and pepper to taste. Once yoghurt has been added, do not allow mixture to boil, or it will curdle. To serve, scatter with coriander and place sliced fresh chilli on the side, if desired. Serve with 2 tablespoons of steamed fragrant wild, basmati or jasmine rice.